Unlocking Access: Benefits for Massachusetts Workers with Disabilities

You don’t have access to this content. Please login.

How to Confirm Legal Parenthood of a Non-Birthing Parent

Every day, children are born to married people and unmarried people, to heterosexual couples and same-sex couples, to people who are not (or no longer) in a relationship, and to biological parents who are married to a non-biological parent. Much of American family law treats married, heterosexual couples as the norm.

When a family structure doesn’t fit into that historical framework, the non-birthing parent has to navigate a specific legal process to be named on the child’s birth certificate and have rights as the child’s lawful parent. Establishing parentage can benefit a child by helping to ensure that both parents support the child financially.

Care teams can educate families about parentage processes to support them in making informed decisions about their rights, with help from this tool, available in English and Spanish.

English

RI - Parentage - English

Spanish

RI - Parentage - Spanish

How care teams and parent leaders can promote a child’s successful transition from early intervention to special education

In Rhode Island, infants and toddlers (0-3) who are at risk for a developmental delay may qualify for Early Intervention (EI) services. In-home EI Specialists develop and follow an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) that is designed to address the unique social, behavioral, and skill-based needs of the child. At age three, all children enrolled in EI are reassessed to determine whether they qualify for services through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 Plan when they go to school (PreK-12). Use this tool to help families problem-solve during this high-stakes transition!

English

RI - Navigating Early Education Transitions - English

Spanish

RI - Navigating Early Education Transitions - Spanish

Cape Verdean Creole

RI - Navigating Early Education Transitions - Cape Verdean Creole

How care teams and parent leaders can promote a child’s successful transition from early intervention to special education

In Massachusetts, infants and toddlers (0-3) who are at risk for a developmental delay may qualify for Early Intervention (EI) services. In-home EI Specialists develop and follow an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) that is designed to address the unique social, behavioral, and skill-based needs of the child. At age three, all children enrolled in EI are reassessed to determine whether they qualify for services through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 Plan when they go to school (PreK-12). Use this tool to help families problem-solve during this high-stakes transition!

English

MA - Navigating Early Education Transitions - English

Spanish

MA - Navigating Early Education Transitions - Spanish

Haitian Creole

MA - Navigating Early Education Transitions - Haitian Creole

You don’t have access to this content. Please login.

How to Confirm Legal Parenthood of a Non-Birthing Parent

Every day, children are born to married people and unmarried people, to heterosexual couples and same-sex couples, to people who are not (or no longer) in a relationship, and to biological parents who are married to a non-biological parent. Much of American family law treats married, heterosexual couples as the norm.

When a family structure doesn’t fit into that historical framework, the non-birthing parent has to navigate a specific legal process to be named on the child’s birth certificate and have rights as the child’s lawful parent. Establishing parentage can benefit a child by helping to ensure that both parents support the child financially.

Care teams can educate families about parentage processes to support them in making informed decisions about their rights, with help from this tool, available in English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole.

English

MA - Parentage - English

Spanish

MA - Parentage - Spanish

Haitian Creole

MA - Parentage - Haitian Creole

Immigration law is technical, complex and changes frequently. It also is very high-stakes for families. All of this can cause people to distrust immigration information and related programs/systems — and this means many families go without financial supports they may be entitled to.
Understanding eligibility for public benefits can be especially complicated for mixed-status families. Yet when talking with these families, care team members can help promote opportunities for benefit maximization!

English

RI - Mixed Status Families - 7.7.2022

Spanish

RI - Mixed Status Families - Spanish

Cape Verdean Creole

RI - Mixed Status Families - Cape Verdean Creole

Immigration law is technical, complex and changes frequently. It also is very high-stakes for families. All of this can cause people to distrust immigration information and related programs/systems — and this means many families go without financial supports they may be entitled to.
Understanding eligibility for public benefits can be especially complicated for mixed-status families. Yet when talking with these families, care team members can help promote opportunities for benefit maximization!

English

MA - Mixed Status Families - 7.7.2022

Spanish

MA - Mixed Status Families - Spanish

Haitian Creole

MA - Mixed Status Families - Haitian Creole

You don’t have access to this content. Please login.

You don’t have access to this content. Please login.

You don’t have access to this content. Please login.