RI – Navigating Parentage in Rhode Island

How to Confirm Legal Parenthood of a Non-Birthing Parent

Every day, children are born to married people and unmarried people, to heterosexual couples and same-sex couples, to people who are not (or no longer) in a relationship, and to biological parents who are married to a non-biological parent. Much of American family law treats married, heterosexual couples as the norm.

When a family structure doesn’t fit into that historical framework, the non-birthing parent has to navigate a specific legal process to be named on the child’s birth certificate and have rights as the child’s lawful parent. Establishing parentage can benefit a child by helping to ensure that both parents support the child financially.

Care teams can educate families about parentage processes to support them in making informed decisions about their rights, with help from this tool, available in English and Spanish.

English

RI - Parentage - English

Spanish

RI - Parentage - Spanish

How to Confirm Legal Parenthood of a Non-Birthing Parent

Every day, children are born to married people and unmarried people, to heterosexual couples and same-sex couples, to people who are not (or no longer) in a relationship, and to biological parents who are married to a non-biological parent. Much of American family law treats married, heterosexual couples as the norm.

When a family structure doesn’t fit into that historical framework, the non-birthing parent has to navigate a specific legal process to be named on the child’s birth certificate and have rights as the child’s lawful parent. Establishing parentage can benefit a child by helping to ensure that both parents support the child financially.

Care teams can educate families about parentage processes to support them in making informed decisions about their rights, with help from this tool, available in English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole.

English

MA - Parentage - English

Spanish

MA - Parentage - Spanish

Haitian Creole

MA - Parentage - Haitian Creole

Immigration law is technical, complex and changes frequently. It also is very high-stakes for families. All of this can cause people to distrust immigration information and related programs/systems — and this means many families go without financial supports they may be entitled to.
Understanding eligibility for public benefits can be especially complicated for mixed-status families. Yet when talking with these families, care team members can help promote opportunities for benefit maximization!

English

RI - Mixed Status Families - 7.7.2022

Spanish

RI - Mixed Status Families - Spanish

Cape Verdean Creole

RI - Mixed Status Families - Cape Verdean Creole

Immigration law is technical, complex and changes frequently. It also is very high-stakes for families. All of this can cause people to distrust immigration information and related programs/systems — and this means many families go without financial supports they may be entitled to.
Understanding eligibility for public benefits can be especially complicated for mixed-status families. Yet when talking with these families, care team members can help promote opportunities for benefit maximization!

English

MA - Mixed Status Families - 7.7.2022

Spanish

MA - Mixed Status Families - Spanish

Haitian Creole

MA - Mixed Status Families - Haitian Creole

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Compassionate Agent of Reality Strategies for SDOH “First Responders”

Health and human service members increasingly are serving as “first responders” to disclosures of high-stakes social, economic and environmental barriers to health. Frequently, the needs involved – such as stable housing and immigration status – are fundamental to a person’s well-being. Meanwhile, often neither federal nor state law offers a remedy and the person has to confront the profound stress, even grief, of learning that an eviction is going to happen or that gaining legal status is out of reach.

MLPB understands that an “occupational hazard” of increasingly systematic SDOH screening practice is the surfacing of profound needs that simply cannot be met in the current law and policy landscape.

We offer the approaches outlined to help facilitate this daunting kind of communication in ways that may buffer against workforce burn-out and despair among the people they serve.

What You Can Do When There is Nothing to Do - MLPB Jan. 2019